When the madness ends


 

Paul Wallis, Sydney Media Jam CO2The most common view of the world as it is now is basically one word – Madness. The madness is the endless wrong calls, the wrong decisions, the psychotic hatreds, the babble, the lies, the corruption, and the crime.

Defining the madnesses, however, is an interesting exercise. The logic of the madness is single minded – If a thing is good for anyone, or makes life easier for anyone, the madness is against it. If a thing does damage to people, in any way, the madness is all for it. If something or someone promotes disunity and hatred, the madness promotes it as an ideological immovable object. If it’s criminal, and causes loss, grief or injury, the madness supports crime in all forms.

If being rich is grounds for optimism, you need to read this. All is for the best in this best of all possible worlds, eh? Just read it, and see history as the obscenity it’s always been.

The current madness, despite its high profile, is pretty average. It’s simply more visible than usual. History is full of the madness, including religion in to a form of oppression, personal wealth in to an excuse for mass poverty, etc. The madness has obstructed all forms of human progress, including medicine, sanitation, research, theories of all kinds, and so on. It’s a very consistent pattern, and always comes from the most insular depths of societies.

In the last 100 years, the madness has supported:

  • Wars of all kinds, including the disastrous First World War, which predicated the geopolitics of the last century.
  • Prohibition, which funded, and still funds, organized crime, arguably the greatest abuser of law in history.
  • The return of slavery, now worldwide, affecting millions of people.
  • Extremism of all kinds, including political polarization.
  • Pollution and global warming, in the name of profits at the expense of human and environmental health.
  • The politics of “deregulation”, which is basically an excuse to commit crimes of all kinds.
  • Selective intrusions of government in to human rights of all kinds.
  • Disenfranchisement of the public in all forms, including actual inputs in to government, which is now a charade at best.
  • Low wages, despite any number of practical economic arguments to the contrary..
  • Much higher costs of living, which have done incredible damage to the previously relatively affluent West.
  • Absurdly high prices for pharmaceuticals at the expense of human health and safety. The ridiculous costs of “research” are a case in point. Researchers know how to cost their work. They don’t talk “billions” for developing a new antidepressant, for example.
  • The corruption of religion, including hate crimes, arming fanatics, and the rest of the nauseating spectacle of religious hypocrisy on all levels.
  • The psychotic level of public discourse, which prevents any rational discussion of anything.
  • The disintegration of countless  societies in the most literal form, to the point of total dysfunction.The Cultural Revolution was one of the worst examples.
  • Routine hate speech and propaganda directed at everyone, to promote disunity.
  • Routine failure to meet basic human needs. This can be anything from funding for education and health to creating obstacle courses to block access to basic needs.

Look familiar? The madness is anti-human in all possible forms. Nothing which benefits humanity is tolerated. There are countless examples of these things in various forms in history. The mentality, however, is constant. Enablers include politicians, clergy, and those who can be easily manipulated or coerced.  The most likely candidates are those who are truly talentless in their fields. There’s a large population of the truly banal, those who want power over others, etc., too.

Paul Wallis books, sydney media jam

The 21st century Stone Age can be creatively counteracted. Creating solutions, creating better options, you name it; this is the way out of the sewer. Interestingly most sociopaths fear creativity, because it adds unknown elements to their environment.

Most of humanity’s greatest achievements have had built-in opposition. If you explore the great successes of the last few hundred years, you’ll note that these successes were achieved despite obstruction at all levels. Even flight was considered impossible in the early 1900s. Travelling at more than 25mph was proven mathematically to be impossible

“Impossible” is the classic terminology of the madness. You’d think nothing was, or ever had been, possible, if you follow this word throughout history.  This rather obscene, and useless, word is used endemically in all obstruction of new science, new economics, and any practical ideas which might improve the human condition.

The madness projects an image of almost obsessive conformity, respectability, and above all, social status. This is the magnet for mediocrity, the underachievers who can only thrive in power systems as office boys and girls.  These people run concentration camps, gulags, paedophile rings, and mad directly or indirectly oppressive governments around the world. Their leaders are the stereotypical dictators, bullies from birth, and as predictable as they seem.

When the madness ends

When the madness ends, it will be the end of:

  • Humanity’s long, pointless war against itself.
  • Corruption
  • Inequalities of all kinds
  • Greed, now obsolete
  • Obstruction to human progress and enlightenment
  • Useless ideologies which have achieved nothing but destruction
  • A hideously polluted, totally mismanaged environment
  • All cultures of fear, intimidation and oppression

When the madness ends, the world will be unrecognizable:

  • Sane societies, with no political parties and their corrupting influences and with proper representation of rights at all levels.
  • No crime, obsolete in a world where material needs are always accessible.
  • A healthy environment, with no pollution or other toxic disasters.
  • No poverty, because people are entitled to all economic necessities.
  • Free health care (easy)
  • Free education (easy)
  • Free housing (easy)
  • Free speech (easy)
  • Free food, healthy and without the non-food elements
  • Freedom of belief, without corrupt organized religions (Luther was right; if you can read, you don’t need “interpreters”, let alone psychopaths. Americans, respect that First Amendment of yours. It’s your instant fix.)
  • Aspirational societies where the future is a positive at all times
  • Fresh air, that incredible super charger of mind and body
  • Safe, sane social environments without the deranged nutcases
  • Trustworthy information accessible at all times
  • A credible, positive future

Worth a try? I think it is.

 

Paul Wallis, Sydney Media Jam, Paul Wallis books

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are Creative Arts Supporting Oppression?


 

Paul Wallis, Sydney Media Jam CO2You’d think that the arts were purely humanistic, purely idealistic, or purely devoted to human wellbeing. Not necessarily so, in practice. Unintentionally or otherwise, the arts may provide the breeding grounds for oppression.

I’ve spent a lot of time criticising the sciences for not seeing the possible risks of new technologies and not creating safeguards for potentially high risk technologies. I think it’s only fair that I should also criticise my own line of work, for exactly the same reason.

Basic premise of creative arts supporting oppression

The problem is that whatever is put into a human mind can become a monster. Creative media of all kinds are fully plugged into human consciousness as never before. I’m not talking about visual propaganda, media propaganda, or other banal, mediocre forms of the arts. I’m talking about ideas. Creative arts, by nature, are based on a range of ideas, half arse or otherwise. Some of these ideas include direct depictions of ideologies, mentalities, insanities, and other human hobbies.

There is a long-standing theory in media psychology which is basically “monkey see, monkey do”. This means essentially that people will imitate anything and everything. Unfortunately, that also includes oppression.

If you take a look at the oppressive regimes in history, you will see that they all have direct antecedent dating back thousands of years. Even the Inquisition wasn’t a particularly original idea, it was based on ancient forms of oppression. The Holocaust, in turn, was based on ideas of racism, systematic oppression, and above all, a highly efficient, murderous method of controlling the public. Media was used as a primary form of control, involving all the arts in some form, from Wagner to posters and slogans.

Where do these ideas come from? Some of them come from history, but a lot of creative art is actually based on history and historical themes. George Orwell’s Animal Farm was based on actual history at the time, incorporating the rise of oligarchies and other obscenities in supposedly socialist states.

Orwell can be accused of nothing more than factual reporting, but Animal Farm is a particularly good example of mentalities. If you have also read The Gulag Archipelago, you may see some unsettling parallels between the two books. The problem is that one book was fiction, and the other was facts, and they have so much in common.

The psychological effects of creative media can be extremely powerful. They are even more powerful when aimed at semiliterate or illiterate people. For example, the whole idea of Western society as it is now is based largely on historical clichés. The society which produced those clichés no longer exists, but the stench lingers. Humanity is now habituated to what was really a series of depictions of daily life, originally intended to be fiction, but now turned into hideous fact.

The immortal Celts in EnglandOkay, so much for the basics. The question is whether or not a dramatic depiction of something or someone actively encourages oppression. On the same basis as “monkey see monkey do”, how many people have been inspired to become history’s leading bastards by creative media? How many people have wittingly or unwittingly written books which have become how-to manuals for oppression? How many musicians have created theme songs for tyrants?

Visual arts, in particular, are front and centre at the moment in terms of propaganda value. Whether it’s memes, photo shopped images, or “fake news” imagery, the visual arts are currently the heavy lifters for propaganda of all kinds. Some of it is intentional, some of it is unintentional, but the likely ramifications could be anything.

The problem is that they created that are now essentially carrying and supporting various types of oppression. This cannot be considered to be a harmless process. Actively supporting prejudice, injustice, and in some cases downright insanity doesn’t help anybody.

When criticising the sciences, I simply said that providing proven nut cases with advanced technologies isn’t and couldn’t be a good idea. The theory is that you can simply not provide the science to these raving lunatics. That may be more than a bit optimistic, but you can also see why that would be a good working solution.

In the case of the arts, the situation is a bit more complex. You can’t tell artists to stop producing art, any more than you can tell scientists to stop producing science. Unlike science, however, the arts are very portable, very easy to produce in any quantity in any form, and easily adapted to just about any situation. Arguably, the creative arts can potentially do much more damage to humanity than science.

Consider some of the all-too-familiar stereotypes of media:

  • The criminal genius
  • The mad scientist
  • The archetypal tyrant, real or imaginary
  • The criminal businessman
  • The fanatic(s) of all kinds
  • The psychotic manager
  • The basic sleazebag
  • The serial killer

It’s quite a list, but you can see how familiar all these characters are in real life. The question is, how many of these morons would have considered becoming these people without a bit of encouragement from creative media? Will they have had the slightest idea how to become what they became?

Answer those questions, and you will solve the problem of creative arts supporting oppression. Until then, be careful what you create, because it may come walking through the door one day.

Paul Wallis, Sydney Media Jam, Paul Wallis books

1918-2018, or Why World War One is part of your life, too


 

Paul Wallis, Sydney Media Jam CO2World War One was the death of a prosperous, relatively happy world. If you read the biographies of people who fought in that war, you’ll see something very familiar  – The loss of a world of youth, and its replacement by a hideous world of ideologies and political insanities. Everyone who fought in that war resented it, and what it did to their lives in so many ways.

The sheer madness of World War One was a guide to the future in so many ways:

Ridiculous basis for a war: The Archduke who was shot and triggered the war was one of the progressives, trying to address the issues for which he was assassinated. It was a sad event, certainly, but not a good reason for an estimated 20 million deaths and four years of mass human misery. There was no reason for this war at all, on any rational basis. One authority comments that the most striking cause for the war was the sheer mediocrity of the people involved, office boys with no clue about warfare or its possibilities, or how to stop a war from happening.

Maniacal conduct of the war: Even those who assumed a war was inevitable never predicted the results. The sheer slaughter of World War One is still statistically as bad as later wars in terms of massacring combatants, usually to achieve absolutely nothing of military or political value. People were walking in to literal hails of machine gun and artillery fire, and they just kept doing it. Millions were killed, and many more maimed for life. The only people who benefited were the arms manufacturers. Everyone else lost.

The most vague political concepts of the war: By 1915, Europe and Russia were annihilating their soldiers at thousands per day, with no clear view of what was to be achieved except “victory”, at the price of an entire generation. Even the Vietnam War doesn’t quite reach this level of mindless obsession.

Social catastrophes: The Russian Revolution, the creation of a maimed and barely viable Germany, and the legacy of Britain’s horrendous war costs were the catalysts for a disgusting, politically corrupt future and the endless local wars of today.  1918 was the benchmark for political failures of all kinds, and the predecessor of “austerity”, that worldwide obscenity, in its first form.

Hijacking democracy: The rise of Fascism, Nazism and Communism date from 1918, too. Ultra-capitalism in the US the early “1%” and the Depression consolidated capitalism in the West as the so-called antithesis of the anti-democratic movements. In practice, capitalism enforced another form of anti-democracy, the hijacking of government by the big capitalists. The New Deal dealt only with the physical problems, not the venal, verminous mindsets which contaminate the world now.

Propaganda and disinformation: Fake news is nothing new. During and after World War One, it became a science, and the basis for Orwell’s 1984. By 1946, it was a standard tool of governments. Some people still fail to recognise that Big Brother is a stagnant, self-limiting, self-oppressing society, dedicated to preserving its owners, not the society.

Ideological warfare in war and peace: The ideologies which sprouted like diseases from World War One’s gigantic cemeteries were arguably worse than the war. These were the excuses for genocide, fire bombing, mass executions, and the vast human disasters in Europe and Asia. Even colonial genocides didn’t reach these industrial scales of mass murder.

Yes, World War One is your problem in 2018

If you’re one of those people who believes that nothing which happened before you were born is relevant to you, you’re very wrong. The map of human misery as it now exists was made in 1918. A war which never needed to happen at all caused it all.

There’s no reason to believe that so many prosperous countries would have torn each other, and themselves, to pieces and set the scene for the 20th century’s hideous “entertainments”. The Holocaust, the Great Depression, and the Cold War could never have happened without World War One.

Gothic Black, Paul Wallis books Amazon

This book is all about fears. It includes a monster which learns how to bore people to death and the wonderful town of Pithcurdle, in which the coming of the dreaded Toothpaste Man is a cause for celebration.

Germany, a middle class country in normal times, could never have been the scene for Nazism without the Treaty of Versailles which sent it broke even before the Depression. Global colonialism would have come and gone on its own. Social changes and improvements for the poor were already happening in the West, and percolating to the East. Before World War One, there were no fanatics running nations. Even when the Russian and Chinese Revolutions first happened, they were led by moderates and academics, not fanatics and criminals.

Science couldn’t have been so easily diverted to military industrial uses, either. World War One turned basic technologies in to high value commercial assets. War, in effect, became truly profitable, and easy to distribute, worldwide. No prizes for seeing the modern parallels and their equally repulsive ramifications.

The same methods, the same stupidity and same basic mindsets are still in play. They’re like some sort of rotting corpse centre stage at a wedding which never quite happens. For some reason, these ugly bastard children of World War One are still calling the shots, a century later.

World War One As Part of Your Life? Yes. Lucky You.

Those who don’t learn from history are fools at best, traitors to humanity at worst. Look and learn. History is the greatest horror stories ever written, and you’re in it, whether you like it or not. NONE of the problems have been solved. If you don’t recognise history as a threat, you may well become history well before your time.

 

www.sydneymediajam.com

Readers note: Having some database issues with the blog, which is why it’s been off and on recently. Hopefully fixed now, but will believe when I see it. 

 

 

 

How to beat fake news


 

Paul Wallis, Sydney Media JamThe fake news plague which hit pandemic levels during the US election is still going on, in slightly reduced, but equally nasty, ways. There are ways of beating this disgusting crap, and they’re pretty simple.

Fake news is based on:

  • Attacking other people or groups, directly or indirectly.
  • Appeals to sympathy, prejudice, and political perspectives.
  • Specific features of a “crime” or “event” which mirror hate speech.
  • “News” which just happens to coincide with a recent statement by some public figure.
  • Combinations of the above, in any form.

The immortal Celts in EnglandLet’s not get too cute about this. Bad things happen in this world. It’s just they don’t usually happen quite so conveniently, at all the right times, in conjunction with speeches or propaganda campaigns.

Real news also doesn’t come in cookie-cutter form. It has specific characteristics. Every story is different enough to be an actual event, not a made-up one.

The basic counter to fake news is “Don’t instantly believe anything without corroboration.” There’s usually a lot of collateral evidence to any real story. This is a fundamental principle of real journalism.

For example:

If an accident happened, there will be:

  • Actual victims
  • Ambulances
  • Police in attendance
  • Blocked roads and traffic backing up
  • Local coverage, and other coverage, will be around the story.
  • Witnesses saying pretty much the same thing but with different views based on where they were at the time.

A reporter would check with a local hospital to see how many people were admitted. Local police would make a statement, usually not much, but confirming some details.  All of this information is findable in about 15 minutes, if you know where to look.

Defining fake news

Fake news, however, comes with little or no corroboration and some “interesting” sources:

  • None, or barely any of the corroboration as happens with a real news story is present.
  • Fake news tends to be sensational, usually at a well-known person or group.
  • Usual themes are crimes, sex, or something “immoral” by community standards.
  • Allegations, usually baseless but damaging, are normal for fake news.
  • Whatever is reported will come out of the blue, with no real background.
  • It breaks from minor league sources, or sources affiliated with someone or something.
  • Nobody else covers it. It’s standalone, most of the time.
  • Sources are vague or badly defined, and tend to be similar publications in terms of what they publish and why they publish it.
  • A surge of copycat “anger” emerges, everyone using the same phrases and keywords. Trolls will emerge like a microwave timer, right on time to go viral with something that never happened at all.

Pretty damn simple, isn’t it?

Ads_Cover_for_KindleSo are the people who make fake news. These are the panel beaters of fake realities. They aim for the lowest common denominator, which means they can’t miss hitting someone. They’re the self-proclaimed good guys, defending the public from a non-existent threat.

If you check their other “work”, it will be a patchwork of similar sewer-grade “news”. They’re career fakes. Hit any link, with your anti-virus up to date, and you’ll see a sort of Diary of a Wannabe Journalist, big stories and everything, all fake news.

Most of them are paid fakes. Few people would do this if they weren’t paid to do it.

It’s so bizarre that even American media, that bus stop to pornography for morons, expects decent money for it.

Beating fake news

To beat fake news:

  • Don’t simply believe things. Check them out.
  • Who else is covering it? Nobody, or just the usual suspects? Probably fake.
  • How much of the story is real, and how much is pure ranting?
  • Hearsay isn’t news. How much of it comes from those actually involved?
  • Allegations are allegations, not news. Accusations aren’t law, either.
  • Are there other, consistent, bits of information which back up the story?

It’ll save you a lot of aggravation.

Paul Wallis, Sydney Media Jam, Paul Wallis books